Archive for August, 2013

Inconsistency

August 24, 2013

el-sisi-al-assad

A rational world order must be consistent. The same laws must apply everywhere. Crimes against humanity, wherever they are committed, must be documented and brought to justice in the International Criminal Court. The International Law Consider terrorism to be deliberate attacks on civilians by either Governments or other groups. Most of the terror in Egypt and Syria seems to come from the state.

Without a consistent order one cannot judge in a conflict between others. Egypt’s military deposed the elected president Mursi through a coup d’etat, there is no other way to describe it. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said in a television interview that the Egyptian army was "restoring democracy" and the UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon said that they focus on how to best support initiatives to restore peace and forge reconciliation.

The problem is that General El-Sisi has launched massacres. On July 8 the army killed more than 50 democracy activists. On July 27, at least 80 more were killed. On August 14 Several hundreds were killed. In Syria Bashar al-Assad got a clear message from this passive support, that he is sovereign to use gas against the Syrians if he want to.
If Egypt’s military regime may get away with impunity so the violence of power will persist. But genocide is genocide wherever it occurs.

An inconsistent and unjust world beds for escalating conflicts and war. To prevent it, lets give a clear signal to President Bashar al-Assad, General El-Sisi, and all others who use deadly force to tacit protesting people: Eventually you will be prosecuted by ICCR and sent to prison.

Flee, fight or stand still?

August 7, 2013

 

Fight, flee or stand still – how do you respond to an attack? Different systems have different kind of self-defence, some fleeing while others defend themselves aggressively. This applies to both biological and artificial systems, such as animals and power structures.

If – say – an impopular leadership is challenged by the people they can drive it away, but the victory is only temporary. The hierarchy will try to return. If the old leader disappears, others will fight to become the new leader and keep their privileges.

At a peaceful transition to democracy, one can expect new wannabee-leaders queuing up to take over. The democratic challenge is to not let them do it, but to stand peacefully as one person and change the whole system, although it may hurt and take some time.

It is not about to choose another leader, but to replace an old system of hierarchy with a new “flat” system where all have the same voting rights – not only at the General Election Days but also in between. The principle is from Aki Orr’s Direct Democracy Manifesto: EVERY CITIZEN – ONE VOTE – ON EVERY POLITICAL DECISION